Kali Linux Install – Setup Kali persistent USB 2016

Kali Persistent USB Setup

After recently deciding to get back into Linux, I decided to start using Kali and ditch Backtrack 5. As you all know, Kali is basically a new, debian, version of Backtrack Linux. kali persistent logo If you haven’t already tried out Kali, a persistent USB is a perfect way to test it out. A Kali persistent USB drive will allow you to run your Linux OS off the USB drive itself, and keep track of your changes. This is great if you want to save your downloaded tools for later, or if you switch between multiple computers often. It’s actually easier than ever to create a persistent copy of Kali. I recommend a USB 3.0 flash drive with 8GB or more of space. I used a 32GB flash drive — Kali itself should take up around 3.5GB to 4GB of space. I am going to be assuming that you are currently a Windows user.

Requirements

  • USB 3.0 drive with at least 8GB of space
  • Windows computer (some software we will use requires Windows)

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WPA_Supplicant config for WPA encryption Backtrack 5

Why use WPA_Supplicant Daemon?

Wpa_supplicant config

So after finding an old Backtrack 5 R3 persistent USB drive I had created years ago, I booted it up to browse the content I had on it. Last time I used it, I was connected to a WEP encrypted network, but as we all know those offer weak protection and are slightly outdated for today. The tools and techniques to break WEP encryption have been around for a while and therefore WEP is rarely used these days. That being said, WPA encryption isn’t flawless, but a better alternative. I’m not going to discuss how to crack those here. Anyway, I figured I would share with you how to connect to a WPA encrypted network in Linux using the terminal and WPA_Supplicant daemon.

If you’re still using Backtrack 5 R3, I recommend upgrading to Kali Linux by creating a persistent USB.

Normally, we use iwconfig to configure wireless networks. However, iwconfig does not support WPA/WPA2 encryption. We have to use the “WPA_Supplicant Daemon” to connect to a WPA encrypted network.

Wpa_supplicant comes pre-installed in most Linux distros (including Backtrack 5 R3, Kali Linux and Ubuntu). Since Backtrack 5 R3 is outdated, it is configured to make connecting to WEP encrypted networks easily,

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